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June 06, 2011

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Kathleen Chevalier

I purchased my wedding gown as ready-to-wear in 1964. It was not expensive, as we did not have much money. My daughter loved that gown and wanted it for her wedding. When I had it cleaned in preparation for altering it for her in 1993, the wedding gown specialist said that gowns of that quality workmanship were rarely found anymore. It fit her perfectly, which surprised me as I didn't think I'd every been that slender, except for the sleeves, which I replaced and lengthening it a bit from shoulder to waist. I have wedding photos of us both.

Debbie Schaefer-Jacobs

To Janice William: Please note in the previous comment that I mention that part of the sentence was missing and it should read: "He returned to his unit in time to participate in further action before returning home to Texas. He was also a veteran of the Normandy Invasion on D-Day- June 6, 1945." Sorry for the confusion.

Janice William

Enjoyed the article, but found one point confusing. If he was shot down in May 1945, how could he return to unit to participate in June 1944 D-Day invasion?

Deb Van

As a lover of vintage textiles, I was so intrigued to read about the wedding gowns made out of WWII parachutes housed in the museum. There they remain the very fabric of our history!

Debbie Schaefer-Jacobs

Good Catch! That sentence should read: "He returned to his unit in time to participate in further action before returning home to Texas. He was also a veteran of the Normandy Invasion on D-Day- June 6, 1945." While I was focusing on Rosalie Bouland's wedding gown, I appreciate clarifying the timeline of Les Bourland's parachute jump and highlighting that 65 years ago he participated in D-Day.

Roxanne M. Merritt

As a side note, aviators who had to eject from their aircraft would be sent a sterling silver caterpillar badge by the respective parachute manufacturer. The badges were usually sent along with a certificate and card to those that had to bail out. The reverse of the badge would be inscribed with the name and rank of the recipient.

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